Tagged: tracking

Root Cause Analysis for Project Managers

Risk management and reduction is an important activity for the project manager. Accidents will always happen and corrective action is then needed to deal with issues encountered during projects. Unfortunately, actions taken to resolve a problem often only address the problem itself, not its underlying causes. This article explains the...

Metrics for Better Software Teams

The article “Moneyball for software engineering” explains how metrics-driven decisions can build better software teams. The basic idea is that organizations can use statistical data to build more competitive teams. Most of us work in software project teams, but we rarely use metrics to identify strengths and weaknesses, set and...

We Deliver Business Value

Agile teams are expected to deliver business value on a regular basis. This focused and fast–paced session provides you with all the techniques you need to do so. We’ll discuss iteration planning, “done done,” velocity, slack, minimum marketable features, working on one thing at a time, risk–adjusted burn–up charts, and...

Change in Productivity

In this blog post, Tom Perry shares his thoughts about how the software project team productivity is influenced by change. Finding that combination of what works for a project can take time. However, when this happens, it will often produce a dramatic improvement in performance and not a slow gradual...

Evaluate Your Project Performance with TSP

The Team Software Process (TSP) provides a framework to predictably and effectively build software-intensive products. It relies on data collected by team members to provide insight into how a software project is operating.

Earned Value Management (EVM) for Mere Mortals

This article explains the usage of Earned Value Management (EVM) in software development projects. EVM is simply a way of calculating two pieces of data for a project: schedule performance and called cost performance.

The Scrum Burn­down Chart

Jeff Suther­land explains in this video that the Burn­down Chart is intended to monitor the simul­ta­ne­ous agile devel­op­ment meth­ods going on within a Scrum team. Like a fighter plane land­ing, there is no room for error, and the chart is intended to mon­i­tor such issues.