Tagged: scrum

Scrum BurnUp Charts

A Scrum BurnUp Chart is a specific Big Visible Chart that is used to show progress for a release or iteration. The horizontal axis represents Time and the vertical axis represents Scope. For a release burn up the horizontal axis is used to represent iterations while for an iteration burn...

Accidental Scrum

This article presents the story of a project that was performed in a Scrum manner without even knowing that the method was Scrum. What initially looked like an impossible project was delivered in six months, with exceptional customer satisfaction and confidence all around. Facing uncertain requirements, the team decided to...

How Does the Project Manager Fit In Scrum?

What is the project manager supposed to do when teams are transitioning to Scrum? This question has already been asked and answered many times, but the answers are often different and sometimes contradict each other. This article discusses ways the project manager can fit into the Scrum, based on personal...

Scrum Maturity Model

Within the agile development methodologies context, the topic of client relationship management is strongly focused, mainly due to the importance of collaboration between the development team and its clients. Most clients avoid or are unable to develop a close cooperation with vendor organizations, since it requires a motivation and close...

An Evolutionary Approach to Implementing XP

In this blog post, Tom Howlett presents how his organization gradually adopted eXtreme Programming (XP) practices. He discussed each XP practices (pair programming, planning game, test driven development, whole team, continuous integration, etc.) and shares his experience for each of them. He also explains their current shift from Scrum to...

Scrum Obstacles

Concrete barriers to Scrum adoption are inevitable. Test cycles will not magically shrink without effort. Most of the challenges in Scrum adoption are not technical, but social.

Interlocking Roles in Agile

This video explores the interlocking roles in Agile software development projects: Agile Coach, Product Owner and Agile Manager.